Why I left the Shia sect?


Note: We will keep updating this post as the brother makes new posts. 

Written by brother Husayn
Original article link

بسم الله الرحمن الرحیم

Assalamu Alaikum,

As requested by some of the brothers on this and other forums, I am officially announcing my rejection of Shiism and my acceptance of true Islam – that of Ahlul Sunnah wal Jama’a.

I’m going to keep this as a short introduction for the time being, and later on, insha’ Allah, I will expound in further detail on exactly why I made this decision.

For some background information regarding myself – all that I will divulge at present is that I currently live in the western world and was born and raised as a Shi’i, and am in my late 20s.
I studied Shi’ism extensively and have been debating with Sunnis for a very long time, both on forums and in real life. I believed fully in the “truth” of Shi’ism and never intended on rejecting it.

I have never studied Shi’ism in any formal sense – my knowledge comes from books that I own, lectures I attended and most importantly the internet, which is a vast repository of almost limitless knowledge.

I am no expert in Rijal, Tafsir, Fiqh or anything of the sort – rather, I am basically a self-educated layman, and instead, I rely on other experts of both Shiism and Ahlul Sunnah to expound the beliefs of both schools and I judge for myself which I believe to be more logical and grounded in truth.

I will not be writing up some story about a journey of spiritual enlightenment or anything of the sort – rather, I’ll keep this topic as simple as possible, and will basically share my views on the major issues between Ahlul Sunnah and the Shia, discussing both viewpoints from my understanding and explaining why I believe that the Shia are wrong about basically everything.

Wa Alaikum Assalam

So to begin, I’ll start with the issue of the Sahabah, and Abu Bakr (RA) specifically.

As a Shi’i, I was taught to believe that the Sahabah were a gang of hypocrites – criminals who betrayed the Prophet and oppressed his family basically from the second he died. The word “Saqifah” invoked only evil connotations and was the embodiment of this betrayal.

As a youngster growing up, I actually took pride in being a “Rafidi”. I would actually use this as a nickname even in video games and email accounts, that’s how proud of it I was.

This is my old Battlefield 2 account: http://spieler-daten.de/bf2_stats/Rafidh

Funny right?

Almost every (private) lecture I attended involved cursing of the Sahabah – either outwardly, or with innuendo. This never happened in public lectures, because Shi’is try to keep this as hidden as possible.

As time went on, however, I came to have serious doubts about these views, as I’ll explain below, focusing mainly on Abu Bakr (RA).

Abu Bakr as-Siddique (RA) in the eyes of a Shi’i

As a Shi’i, Abu Bakr’s case was clearcut. He was the instigator of this betrayal and by far the most despised of the companions in my eyes. The major reason, of course, was that he was ‘Aisha’s father, so he received a double dose of curses whenever his name was mentioned. Not to mention, he stole Fadak from Fatima and made up some hadith from the Prophet to justify it. He was a thief and a devil. Not to mention he was a coward – remember how he was scared and about to betray the Prophet in the cave? I could never understand how Sunnis thought so highly of him – they were clearly misguided and ignorant people.

However, as time went on, certain facts came to light about Abu Bakr, and some doubts started creeping into my mind regarding him.

For example, he was one of the first people to become a Muslim. According to authentic reports, he was the first adult male to embrace Islam. Shi’is of course deny this, and when I asked this question to a more “learned” Hajj, he said “no, more like the twentieth or thirtieth”. Upon further research, it became clear that the consensus was that he was definitely the first adult male to embrace Islam. This complicated matters.

Let us assume he wasn’t the first male – let’s accept for arguments sake that Abu Bakr was the 30th male to embrace Islam. Either way, the same questions come to light. Clearly, he didn’t embrace Islam when it was strong and the Prophet had many followers. Whether he was the first or the 30th, he embraced Islam when it was weak, and its future was very cloudy.

So why did this evil man accept Islam when so few others did?

Did he receive any wealth because of it? No – the Prophet had no wealth to give him, and Abu Bakr was already a wealthy man.

Did he receive power? Sure, Abu Bakr was from a minor tribe of Quraish, maybe his accepting Islam would give him more power? The answer to that is no – he didn’t get any power from becoming Muslim, in fact, he lost power as the chiefs of Quraish now viewed him negatively.

How about respect? Maybe Abu Bakr wanted people’s respect by becoming a Muslim? No – Abu Bakr got the complete opposite, he actually lost respect, and authentic reports state that he was actually beaten up several times.

These were very tricky questions for me as a Shi’i. They didn’t add up with the overall evil image we have of Abu Bakr. How is it possible to reconcile his later actions with his earlier actions? His earlier apparently sincere acceptance of Islam when it was weak and powerless, and his later actions as the chief tyrant who oppressed Ahlul Bayt and stole their rights?

2 Comments

Filed under Articles, Guided Ones

2 responses to “Why I left the Shia sect?

  1. Hussain

    Assalamualikum,
    This guy lacks credibility to explain why he has left shiasm …His lack of knowledge made him do that, those who want to know the truth about sahaba then check your books…[LINK REMOVED]

    [LINK REMOVED]

    [LINK REMOVED]

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